Painting

This Innovative Artist Paints Eye-Opening Creations On Tiny Canvases

“Makeup can be so much more than meets the eye,” Tal Peleg writes, and she means that quite literally.

Plenty of makeup artists can deftly wing out black eyeliner with a flick of the wrist, but turning eyelids into canvases for miniature paintings requires a pretty unique skillset. Instead of hosting smokey eyes and cut creases, Peleg’s eyes serve as windows into the books, plays, films, and myths that we all know and love.

“Frozen”

“Moulin Rouge”

“Deadpool”

“The Wizard of Oz”

“Mary Poppins”

“The Princess Bride”

“The Sound of Music”

“The Giving Tree”

“The Shining”

“Pet Cemetery”

“The Moomins”

“Les Miserables”

“How to Train Your Dragon”

“The NeverEnding Story”

“Pandora’s Box”

“Big Hero 6”

“Little Red Riding Hood”

“Cinderella”

“The Diary of Anne Frank”

“Snow White”

(via My Modern Met)

Tal Peleg is pretty prolific in her scope, so if your favorite story didn’t make an appearance in this roundup, look for it on the artist’s Facebook and Instagram pages! Be sure to follow her for regular updates.

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/eyelid-art/


The Thing All Of These Paintings Have In Common Is Incredible…And Unexpected

Synesthesia is the neurological condition in which the stimulation of one sense leads to the automatic experience of another sense.

That might sound confusing, and it is for most people who aren’t affected by it, but as an example, when some synesthetes hear a number or letter, they immediately picture a color. That color is always associated with that particular character.

For Melissa McCraken, though, her synesthesia also manifests itself when music comes on — she hears a song and immediately pictures colors, images, and textures. What she does with that experience is nothing short of breathtaking.

It wasn’t until she was 15 that McCracken realized not everyone saw letters and numbers as colors, too.

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McCracken explains that her brain is “cross-wired,” so she experiences “the ‘wrong’ sensation to certain stimuli.

If this is what wrong looks like, something has got to be right here. McCracken sees music as colors.

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Living in a Lisa Frank world.

Posted by Melissa S. McCracken on Wednesday, June 24, 2015

This is what “Lenny” by Stevie Ray Vaughan looks like to her.

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Lenny – Stevie Ray Vaughan Allllmost ready!www.melissasmccracken.com

Posted by Melissa S. McCracken on Sunday, March 20, 2016

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John Lennon, “Imagine”

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You know, I think it's time I posted a piece with the music that inspired it. It's all about the connection and…

Posted by Melissa S. McCracken on Thursday, July 9, 2015

The Beatles, “Blackbird”

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Just finished this little babe. Inspired by Blackbird – The Beatles24" x 24" oil and acrylic on canvas

Posted by Melissa S. McCracken on Monday, November 9, 2015

Listen to McCracken discuss her synesthesia below:

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At the Hilliard Gallery in Kansas City, Missouri, Melissa S. McCracken paints a world most people can't see. As a synesthete, she can see sounds in brilliant color.

Posted by Great Big Story on Tuesday, March 22, 2016

How beautiful is that? It must be an incredible thing to experience a song on so many levels. If you’d like to learn more about McCracken’s work, check out her website here. And don’t forget to follow her on Facebook and Instagram!

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/synesthesia-artist/


This Amazing Artist Blends Reality With Her Paintings. Don’t Trust Your Eyes.

Australian artist Emma Hack excels at blending realities. She received international attention after working with Grammy-winning musician Goyte for his “Somebody I Used To Know” video. (That was some epic body painting.)

Hack uses paint to camouflage her subjects, a task that can take anywhere from 8 to 15 uninterrupted hours. She then captures the incredible effect with photography and was put on display earlier this year during an exhibition at the Rebecca Hossack Art Gallery. Take a look at her impressive work.

Peacock with Yellow Butterflies

Seville

Fans

Wallpaper Black Cockatoos

Evolution Crocodile

China

Building Facade Porto

Carnation Mandala

I’m stunned.

If you want to find out more about Emma’s work, check out her website or the gallery’s page.

Read more: http://viralnova.com/undercover-art/