art

These 10 CGI Works Of Art Are Just Too Creepy To Handle

Computer-generated imagery, or CGI, is an awesome technology that has allowed us to create amazingly realistic simulations in movies, video games, and more.

But while CGI enables us to produce cool effects, it can also inspire some people to bring the dark scenes in their heads to life. Let’s just say that these scenes, some of which you can see below, are completely freaky.

Prepare yourselves, because we’re about to take a journey down the rabbit hole.

1. Their smiles make me shudder.

2. Wait, nevermind — this one is much worse.

YouTube / popcorn10

3. I really, really don’t like those teeth.

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4. I’m 500 percent sure that’s going to show up in my nightmares.

Gfycat

Read More: When A Hotel Worker Went To Investigate Screams Coming From An Empty Room, THIS Walked Out

5. This isn’t the work of a serial killer at all…

6. How do you even come up with something this twisted?

YouTube / popcorn10

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7. The music makes it so much creepier.

8. You might want to move back from your screen for this one.

Gfycat

9. You’re also a terror-aholic.

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Read More: This Office Building Was Empty…But The Security Cameras Tell A Different Story

10. Well, that’s completely disturbing.

YouTube / popcorn10

I have to admit that these are cool in their own creepy ways, but they sure are unsettling, to say the least.

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/cgi-horrors/


This Sculpture Changes Before Your Eyes. You Need To See It To Believe It.

Artist Thomas Medicus did not just want to create one painting. Instead, the Austrian artist created something between a painting and a sculpture that changes depending on how it’s viewed. 

Emulsifier is composed of 160 glass strips, and each strip is painted on all four sides with pieces of different images. Depending on what side of the four-sides sculpture you’re standing on, you’ll see one of four images. A fish and a stork make up two, and the stork’s and fish’s interior views make up the other two. 

Stork exterior

Stork interior

Fish exterior

Fish interior

Viewed from the top, Emulsifier appears to be a series of narrow glass panes with scattered fragments of paint.

 Besides painting on glass to blow our minds, Medicus also works as a graphic designer, illustrator and animator, as well as a musician. 

Read more: http://viralnova.com/emulsifier/


With A Little Help From Gravity, This Guy Creates Hypnotic Music

Watching people do what they do best is always a gratifying experience. Whether you’re in the presence of an expert orator who can bring an entire audience to its feet or you’re in the crowd cheering for a star athlete, it’s always cool to see someone in their element.

And there’s something uniquely wonderful about watching musicians at work. When it comes to making us jealous, these virtuosos know exactly how it’s done. If you thought pianists and violinists were enviable, wait until you see what this guy can do.

Swedish musician Martin Molin from the band Wintergatan created this one-of-a-kind instrument that plays stunning music with a little help from gravity.

To learn more about this incredible music machine, check out the band’s website. For regular updates, follow Wintergatan on Facebook!

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/marble-music/


The Thing All Of These Paintings Have In Common Is Incredible…And Unexpected

Synesthesia is the neurological condition in which the stimulation of one sense leads to the automatic experience of another sense.

That might sound confusing, and it is for most people who aren’t affected by it, but as an example, when some synesthetes hear a number or letter, they immediately picture a color. That color is always associated with that particular character.

For Melissa McCraken, though, her synesthesia also manifests itself when music comes on — she hears a song and immediately pictures colors, images, and textures. What she does with that experience is nothing short of breathtaking.

It wasn’t until she was 15 that McCracken realized not everyone saw letters and numbers as colors, too.

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McCracken explains that her brain is “cross-wired,” so she experiences “the ‘wrong’ sensation to certain stimuli.

If this is what wrong looks like, something has got to be right here. McCracken sees music as colors.

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Living in a Lisa Frank world.

Posted by Melissa S. McCracken on Wednesday, June 24, 2015

This is what “Lenny” by Stevie Ray Vaughan looks like to her.

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Lenny – Stevie Ray Vaughan Allllmost ready!www.melissasmccracken.com

Posted by Melissa S. McCracken on Sunday, March 20, 2016

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John Lennon, “Imagine”

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You know, I think it's time I posted a piece with the music that inspired it. It's all about the connection and…

Posted by Melissa S. McCracken on Thursday, July 9, 2015

The Beatles, “Blackbird”

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Just finished this little babe. Inspired by Blackbird – The Beatles24" x 24" oil and acrylic on canvas

Posted by Melissa S. McCracken on Monday, November 9, 2015

Listen to McCracken discuss her synesthesia below:

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At the Hilliard Gallery in Kansas City, Missouri, Melissa S. McCracken paints a world most people can't see. As a synesthete, she can see sounds in brilliant color.

Posted by Great Big Story on Tuesday, March 22, 2016

How beautiful is that? It must be an incredible thing to experience a song on so many levels. If you’d like to learn more about McCracken’s work, check out her website here. And don’t forget to follow her on Facebook and Instagram!

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/synesthesia-artist/